The Director Speaks


Making The Glitch has been a journey of discovery containing many moments of self-reflection,
wonderment and horror. We shot sporadically for four days, but it took six months to organize while keeping down a day job, burning candles at both ends, and coaxing miracles to happen with very little money.


The story was born out of frustration at having been unable to create a short movie of my own, despite living and working in the Los Angeles filmmaking community. Why should it be so hard? I used to make films with some regularity while I was growing up in England, but now life, career and city filming permits conspired against me. My modest attempt to shoot a ten-minute Outer Limits fell flat on its face.


Late one evening, inspiration struck, a new idea for an all-digital short dropped into my lap. I scribbled down a few notes: I would shoot it all myself on DV, playing all the parts, a completely self-contained production. As pieces clicked into place -- screenplay, high-def camera, SAG actor, music, locations --
ambitions grew and the project took on a life of its own. It was weird, it was fun, it was draining my bank account; but we were making a real movie, with craft services and everything, telling a story that, months later, outgrew my expectations but miraculously pretty closely approximated the original intent.


During post-production, while batting around ideas with my composer, Laurent Watteau, I attempted to clarify that intent with the following explanation as to what The Glitch was all about, proving that sometimes these things do not become apparent until they are ready to reveal themselves.


Scroll to read (with a ‘spoiler’ warning if you have not seen the movie yet):


Harry Owen is a little man controlled by a huge bureaucracy that he is completely unaware of -- a giant conspiracy of ‘Harry’s who simply use him as their pawn, moving him around in the digital short movie world where he resides, so they can all exist in this digital dimension. It's survival of the pixels! As Harry becomes aware of the pixels in rebellion, it becomes an infernal dance, a battle for survival, and Harry Owen will never be the same again.